kids at weddings

Best-Of Our Wedding Rehearsal Tips

Wednesday, June 20th, 2018 | Filed under: Best Of, wedding planning, Wedding Rehearsal, Wedding Rehearsals | author: By Paul Keenan,    

Best-Of Our Wedding Rehearsal TipsYou’ll gather your bridal party members, officiant, and other important participants in your wedding ceremony for your rehearsal, which is usually held the day or night before the wedding, giving everyone the chance to walk through all of the steps of the ceremony so that everyone is familiar and comfortable with the proceedings during the actual ceremony. Your wedding coordinator may lead the lessons, or you may ask a trusted friend or relative to assist, for a few run-throughs. If you have any questions about who should attend the rehearsal, and especially how to help child bridal party members learn their roles, we’ve collected some of our Best-Of blog posts about what goes on at the rehearsal and how to manage yours the best ways possible:

Wedding Rehearsal

What is a Wedding Rehearsal?

Wedding Rehearsal Planning provides start-to-finish guidance on planning your wedding rehearsal, including who gets invited to the rehearsal, who runs the wedding rehearsal, and how a rehearsal is organized so that you and everyone in your wedding party is comfortable with each step of your ceremony.

How to Plan The Best Guest List

Who Attends the Wedding Rehearsal? We help answer this important question with guidelines on who is the best to invite to your rehearsal, from bridal party members to the people who will do readings during your ceremony, and especially child bridal party members and their parents, who can help motivate the little ones to listen and practice their steps and the tossing of flower petals.

How to Best Guide The Kids

Kids at the Wedding Rehearsal helps you guide the littlest members of your bridal party with their roles, and we also provide some smart tips to help prevent tantrums (note: make sure their outfits and hair décor are comfy!) We help the smallest stars of your bridal party shine on the big day.

Make it the Best it Can Be

Requesting Changes at the Wedding Rehearsal The practice run-though of your wedding ceremony is important also to bring to your attention any detail that needs changing, such as how to pair up your bridal party members, how to group odd numbers of bridal party members, timing the ceremony steps, and positioning where people will stand. You may think you know exactly how your ceremony will go, but in this rehearsal, you and your wedding planner or wedding venue site manager can spot essential changes to be made for the betterment of your perfect wedding ceremony.

Kids’ Table Tips

Wednesday, December 16th, 2015 | Filed under: Kids' Table, Wedding guests, wedding planning, Wedding Seating Chart | author: By Keith Sly,    

KidsTableTips
If your answer to “Should we allow guest to bring their kids to our wedding?” is Yes, you’ll then have to answer the question of where to seat kids at the wedding. Making a wedding seating chart is often a challenge, so it’s important to decide on your seating plan for kids at a wedding.

We have some tips to help you out:
Read more…

Helping Kids at the Wedding Rehearsal

Sunday, December 18th, 2011 | Filed under: wedding planning, wedding receptions, Wedding Rehearsal, Wedding Rehearsals | author: By Keith Sly,    

While some wedding websites advise choosing child attendants who are no younger than six years old, we know that your adored nieces and nephews may be younger than that, and you very much want them to be your flower girls and ringbearers. Here at our wedding banquet hall and wedding gardens, we’ve seen children as young as two perform quite well as child attendants, and the key is smart preparations for the little ones at the wedding rehearsal.

Our wedding staff, as well as the top wedding coordinators and special event experts in the New Jersey region, has helped many brides and grooms during their wedding rehearsals, offering our expertise in helping flower girls and ringbearers prepare for their big moment at the wedding. The key, we’ve found, is making sure kids are comfortable, know what to expect, and know what they might earn by behaving well.

Here are some top tips for helping kids at your wedding rehearsal, improving your odds of a tantrum-free day:

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  • Be sure that child attendants will be comfortable in their wedding day clothing. Itchy lace collars and shirt tags that poke, too-tight bow ties and other wardrobe issues are the #1 cause of kids’ acting badly at weddings. So be sure the kids’ dresses and tuxes have been checked and adjusted to allow for the little ones’ comfort.
  • Be sure that kids have eaten before the wedding, and that they’ve had plenty of water to drink. Hunger and thirst are also top causes of kids’ misbehavior. So practice the same Musts for the rehearsal.
  • Tell kids what they’ll see when they walk down the aisle. A practice walk down empty rows is very different than the people-filled rows, flashbulbs, flowers and other distractions. From the youngest kids to the teens, spell out the things they’re likely to see as they walk down the aisle.
  • For small children, have a treat waiting for them at the end of the aisle. A grandparent might be holding a big, colorful lollipop or a (silent) toy that they can have when they reach the end of the aisle.
  • Allow kids to sit down during the ceremony. This big trend provides for kids’ comfort, they can sit with parents who can shush them if needed, and kids won’t be tempted to wander around, fidget or panic in the face of so many people looking at them.
  • Let kids practice their walks down the aisle a few times, and test out who they’re most comfortable walking with. There’s no rule saying the flowergirl has to walk alone. If she’s happiest walking with the maid of honor, that adjustment may be made.
  • If children are frightened, talk with them privately to ask what they’re concerned about. A child is more likely to open up about her shoes being slippery on the aisle runner than she might be with a dozen strangers looking at her.
  • Prepare children for what happens after the ceremony, they’ll pose for photos, then be introduced into the room at the reception, dance and sit with the other kids. When children know what to expect, they don’t act out as much.

Keep these tips in mind, and your child attendants will have more fun, be happier and more comfortable and thus be a wonderful part of your wedding day.

Best,

Michael Mahle, Director of Communications, pleasantdale Château

To make an appointment with a banquet manager, please contact us at 973-731-3100.